ABOUT The Adventures of Horace Horrise                                                                             (For People, Places and Events, Click Here)

(Scroll down for Guinness World Records Record Attempt)

It was whilst writing “In You Go! A year or two in the life of a scout leader” that it became apparent that there was great demand for books that tell of the exploits of adventurous young people in a contemporary setting. I had always been a fan of Richmal Crompton’s* “Just William” series of books with their small cast, led by a boy who used to get into all sorts of bother but usually ended up smelling of roses, so to speak. I felt that more than ever there was, as well as a demand, a need for a modern-day William who would carry the torch for young people enjoying themselves in the open air with minimal disturbance from technology and, to a lesser extent, adults.

 

Naturally, as a scout leader, I had my source material with the scouting programme built to provide enjoyment and fun, participation in activities - both indoors and outdoors, learning by doing, sharing in spiritual reflection, taking responsibility and making choices, undertaking new and challenging activities, and making and living by the Scout Promise.

 

I also had the setting for my main character, Horace - a boy who wasn’t to start with, but desperately wanted to be, a scout. Horace, like most of my real scouts, lives in Chislehurst in Kent on the London border. Chislehurst is, in the main, fairly affluent and the characters of Horace and his friends are drawn from the people around us with the situations that they get into often based on actual events, but no more than that.

 

After the dust had settled on my second book, “Sleeping Bags and Tortures. The Private Diaries of an Adventurous Scout and his Scout Leader,” instead of immediately continuing with the third and final book in the series, I picked up my metaphorical pen and wrote nine stories focussing on Horace and his adventures. Scouting binds the stories together, but his exploits are mostly outside of scouting events where his comments are unguarded and his activities are not risk assessed.

 

Too long to put into a single book, the nine stories are being published as individual novellas or novelettes. Although each one is a stand-alone tale in its own right there are common threads running through the nine and so, to maximise one’s understanding of people, places and events, I would recommend that they are read in order. “Horace Horrise wants to be a Scout” is the first in the series.

 

As a final comment, although I started writing for my scouts and those of a similar age, I appear to have ended up with stories that may appeal more to an adult market – just saying!

 

*As an interesting footnote, Richmal Crompton ended her days living in Chislehurst. Maybe some, just some, of William’s breath has been swallowed by Horace.

 

THE ADVENTURES OF HORACE HORRISE

Book 1 Horace Horrise wants to be a Scout

Book 2 Horace Horrise gets Lost

Book 3 Horace Horrise throws a Party... (Guiness World Record Attempt)

Book 4 Horace Horrise goes Narrowboating

Book 5 Horace Horrise’s Grandad gets a Haircut

Book 6 Horace Horrise goes to Church

Book 7 Horace Horrise catches a Shoplifter

Book 8 Horace Horrise and the Rickshaw

Book 9 Horace Horrise gets Invested

ABOUT Book 1

Horace Horrise wants to be a Scout

Published: 1st March 2017

 

Horace Horrise lives in Chislehurst, Kent where he’s a very busy young man, too busy to be a scout. One night when he’s looking up at the stars he fleetingly wonders about becoming a spaceman when he’s older. He decides that soon he will need to start preparing for whatever he’s going to choose to do in life.

 

Horace’s best friend Charlie tells him that most astronauts have been scouts so what better initial preparation than to become a scout? The only problem is that there appear to be no vacancies in his local troop. He even takes to prayer in his attempts to get a place!

 

Horace keeps his hopes alive during the long wait by helping Charlie to build a periscope, a project that Charlie started in cubs but hadn’t finished. It’s when Horace tries to source some materials in order to make his own periscope that things start to go wrong.

 

Horace fails to realise that in his quest for periscope perfection he inadvertently helps rekindle his parent’s relationship with each other whilst learning things about them that he did not previously know.

 

Eventually Horace succeeds in getting his hands on a periscope and makes a very surprising discovery.

 

"Horace Horrise wants to be a Scout" is the first in a series of nine stories that make up "The Adventures of Horace Horrise", the 21st century’s answer to Richmal Crompton’s "Just William".

 

This edition is not suitable for younger children.

 

Horace Horrise drawing: Anton Brand / Shutterstock

Cover front Amazon Horace badge Oris

ABOUT Book 2

Horace Horrise gets Lost

Published: 1st June 2017

 

Horace Horrise lives in Chislehurst, an affluent village in Kent where it’s difficult to get into any after-school club because every parent worth their weight will have signed their offspring up for everything, and scouts is no exception.

 

Unbeknown to Horace, someone has been pulling a few strings, and before too long he’s on his way to his first scout meeting. His mother is grateful that Horace offers to take himself up the road by himself and so she settles down with a magazine and glass of wine to welcome in the weekend.

 

However, Mrs Horrise is soon to regret putting her own needs above those of her younger son. For whilst she is relaxing at home with her husband, Horace is already “doing his best” before he even reaches the scout hut. In fact, he takes so long to arrive, having been called upon to assist a couple of needy groups, that when he does finally come within sight of the scout hut he sees something that fills him with fear and confusion. He has to get away as quickly as he can and so he does, but in running from the scene he makes a foreseeable situation much, much worse.

 

Soon a quiet Friday night in Chislehurst is awoken by a wail of sirens as the emergency services struggle to find Horace before it’s too late. Horace’s parents are beside themselves with worry, but who gets to Horace first?

 

Horace Horrise gets Lost is the second in a series of nine stories that make up The Adventures of Horace Horrise, the

21st century’s answer to Richmal Crompton’s Just William.

9781897864357 Amazon Cover - Front

ABOUT Book 3

Published: 1st September 2017

 

Book 3 has the world's longest book title and is presently seeking official recognition in the category of  "Longest Title of a Book" with Guinness World Records.

 

The title is "Horace Horrise throws a party, or Horace Horrise and Charlie, or Horace Horrise and his newly ironed scout shirt, or Horace Horrise and his second-hand activity trousers, or Horace Horrise and the mysterious dollar sign, or Horace Horrise  gets grounded for a week, or Horace Horrise and The Grand Old Duke of York, or Horace Horrise and the locked gate, or Horace Horrise and the blue rope, or Horace Horrise and the lashing, or Horace Horrise finds his way to the scout hut, or Horace Horrise and the kangaroos, or Horace Horrise tries to make it up to his parents, or Horace Horrise is not left on his own, or Horace Horrise and the allotments, or Horace Horrise makes a friend, or Horace Horrise makes some new friends, or Horace Horrise gets into more trouble, or Horace Horrise runs amok in Chislehurst, or Horace Horrise and The Lion’s Head, or Horace Horrise the lion tamer, or Horace Horrise and Eric the kangaroo, or Horace Horrise rides in Eric’s pouch, or Daddy kangaroos don’t have pouches, or Horace Horrise gets shortened, or Horace Horrise eats kangaroo at The Lion’s Head, or Horace Horrise and the bouncing kangaroos, or Kangaroos don’t have wings, or Horace Horrise and his smart scout leader, or Horace Horrise the timekeeper, or Horace Horrise is Badhorace, or Horace Horrise and 3rd Chislehurst Scout Group, or Horace Horrise with soap and water, or Horace Horrise and no diversions, or Horace Horrise and the kangaroo patrols, or Horace Horrise sticks with the birds, or Horace Horrise the chief fundraiser, or Horace Horrise the Raven, or Horace Horrise the Ravings, or Horace Horrise meets Edward, Melanie and Archie, or Horace Horrise meets the Peckers, or Horace Horrise and his favourite things, or Horace Horrise goes red and the scouts fall silent, or Raving Horace Horrise arrives, or Horace Horrise and his anxious mother, or Charlie brings Horace Horrise home, or Horace Horrise and the slice of Victoria sponge, or Horace Horrise doesn’t need bribing, or Horace Horrise demolished the cake, or Horace Horrise is getting invested, or Horace Horrise gets back in one piece, or Horace Horrise and the smallholder badge, or Horace Horrise grants his mother’s wish, or Horace Horrise and the secret potatoes, or Horace Horrise and the broken mirror confession, or Horace Horrise for one night only, or Horace Horrise and the fiftieth birthday celebrations, or Horace Horrise and the churchyard, or Horace Horrise and the Scout Promise, or Horace Horrise and squash, buns and cake, or Horace Horrise and the daffodil bulbs, or Horace Horrise digs up a body, or Horace Horrise and the escaping bodies, or Horace Horrise and the worms, or Horace Horrise and Arnold John Grieve, or Horace Horrise doesn’t get in first, or Horace Horrise and the first fairy cake, or Horace Horrise and the graves of the famous and infamous, or Horace Horrise and a Member of Parliament, a poet and a world record breaker, or Horace Horrise and any questions, or Horace Horrise and knock, knock, knock, or Horace Horrise and the mourners, or Horace Horrise and manual work, or Horace Horrise helps the church people, or Horace Horrise and his worm diet, or Horace Horrise and the potatoes and pumpkin, or Horace Horrise and the trap, or Horace Horrise plays it safe, or Horace Horrise looks for Vera, or Horace Horrise and the bean spiller, or Horace Horrise and the feminist, or Horace Horrise and the smart summer dress, or Horace Horrise and Edward’s pressing question, or Horace Horrise and his frenzied imagination, or Horace Horrise and the community projects, or Horace Horrise with the old men and their plots, or Horace Horrise and the lazy men, or Horace Horrise and the bindweed, or Horace Horrise and the turd trailer, or Horace Horrise and the horse manure, or Horace Horrise and the kangaroo talk, or Horace Horrise and the manure spreaders, or Horace Horrise and the black sacks, or Horace Horrise and the mole invasion, or Horace Horrise and the two doughnuts, or Horace Horrise and the spoilsports, or Horace Horrise and the triple chocolate doughnut, or Horace Horrise and the farming and livestock, or Horace Horrise and the cats, dogs and rabbits, or Horace Horrise bee hives, or Horace Horrise is offended, or Horace Horrise works like a Trojan, or Horace Horrise and the Rhode Island Red, or Horace Horrise and Albert the cockerel, or Horace Horrise and the honeycomb and honey, or Horace Horrise and the small matter, or Horace Horrise and his disappearing brother, or Horace Horrise and the chips and ice cream, or Horace Horrise and the garden lawn, or Horace Horrise and two hundred turves, or Horace Horrise and the memorial garden, or Horace Horrise and the Champagne, or Horace Horrise and the quick sandwich, or Horace Horrise and the out of tune adults, or Horace Horrise and the bamboo sticks, or Horace Horrise and the garden machinery, or Horace Horrise and the rotavators, or Horace Horrise and the hermit crab, or Horace Horrise and the runner beans, or Horace Horrise and the broken glasses, or Horace Horrise and the cup and ball game, or Horace Horrise and the six roosters, or Horace Horrise and the periscope, or Horace Horrise and the transformational gardening, or Horace Horrise and the beer barrel, or Horace Horrise and his brother’s cooking, or Horace Horrise and the early breakfast, or Horace Horrise and Zen, or Horace Horrise and the huge hammer, or Horace Horrise and Chislehurst Marquees, or Horace Horrise meets Billy and Webbo, or Horace Horrise and Mammoth, or Horace Horrise and the molten mud, or Horace Horrise and the milky sangria, or Horace Horrise and the camomile and spiced apple with cinnamon, or Horace Horrise and the four teaspoonfuls, or Horace Horrise and the generous donation, or Horace Horrise and the churchwarden, or Horace Horrise and the peach schnapps, or Horace Horrise and the laundry basket, or Horace Horrise and the hose, or Horace Horrise and the rocket, or Horace Horrise and Chislehurst Catering, or Horace Horrise and Chislehurst String Quartet, or Horace Horrise and Old Elthamian’s mud bath, or Horace Horrise goes as white as a sheet, or Horace Horrise and Edgar Fripp, or Horace Horrise writes a letter, or Horace Horrise and Chesney Golf Club, or Horace Horrise and the happy birthday, or Horace Horrise and Bert’s Sloe Gin, or Horace Horrise and the four black bags, or Horace Horrise and Great Uncle Stanley, or Horace Horrise and the bondaged geriatric punk, or Horace Horrise and Auntie May, or Horace Horrise and the wedding cake, or Horace Horrise and the grass seed, or Horace Horrise and the car park in his road, or Horace Horrise and the Organising Abilities activity badge, or Horace Horrise gets prepared, or Horace Horrise gets nearer to being invested, or Horace Horrise comes up smelling of roses once again."

 

This book is the third in a series of nine stories that make up The Adventures of Horace Horrise, the 21st century’s answer to Richmal Crompton’s Just William.

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